The effects of television on filipino children

People in the house are usually tuned in to TV — siblings as well as parents. Also, many parents buy videos that they think can make their kids smart. But how does watching TV really affect children? They cite the following:

The effects of television on filipino children

TV steals children’s time from important activities

The effects of television on language skills: Does TV really prevent learning? The more time babies spend watching television, the more slowly they learn to talk.

The effects of television on filipino children

Some people conclude that the effects of television on children are direct and negative. According to this view, television is noxious, like cigarette smoke. But whereas cigarettes damage the lungs, television damages the mind. Watching TV makes you quite literally dumb. What the data really show Television is merely a medium for transmitting information.

Possibly, certain aspects of television—like the fast pace or rapid change of scenes—might contribute to the development of short attention spans. What does seem likely is that babies have a relatively difficult time learning to talk by watching and listening to TV programs. To learn to speak, babies benefit from social interaction.

When it comes to learning speech, nothing beats a live conversation Patricia Kuhl, a leading researcher in the field of language acquisition, has demonstrated this point in some elegant experiments on babies.

Kuhl and her colleagues presented 9-month old American babies with an unfamiliar language—Mandarin Chinese. In one experiment, babies were allowed to interact with a real, live Mandarin speaker.

NCCT Research: Television Viewing of the Filipino Children

After 12 sessions, these babies showed an enhanced ability to discriminate certain speech sounds that are common in the Mandarin language.

But when the experiment was repeated with another set of infants who watched only televised language tutors, the results were different.

The babies exposed to Mandarin via TV were no more likely than control infants to discriminate Mandarin speech sounds Kuhl et al Research suggests that conversation, not listening to stories or watching TV, has the strongest positive effect on language development This idea is supported by a recent study that fitted young children, aged zero to four years, with recording devices Christakis et al The devices allowed researchers to objectively measure how much adult conversation and television each child experienced.

The results were intriguing. Researchers discovered that social talk—one-on-one, back-and-forth conversation between adults and their children—was linked with better language development. The more time babies and toddlers were included in adult conversations, the more quickly their language skills improved.

By contrast, listening to adult monologues—including storytelling--was only weakly correlated with language development.

The effect of two-way conversations was almost 6 times greater than the effect of merely listening to adults talk. When researchers controlled for the amount of time that kids spent in conversation, the effect of television on children was neither positive nor negative.

Other, more recent studies have yielded similar conclusions. When researchers have followed the development of young children, they have found that kids who spend more time talking with adults end up with larger vocabularies.

Most Filipino children watch television for close to 3 hours during weekdays, and 6 hours during weekends, the same study showed. Hence, we could test the effect of television and movie viewing on changes over time in these hypothesized intermediate variables, and subsequent effects of the intermediate variables on change in school performance. The social effects of improper advertising generally manifest themselves in the form of an adverse effect on child psychology (Haefner, ), human behavior (Lavine et al., ), value system and perception (Roy, ), boost to materialism.

And an experiment using video chat technology really drives the point home.Batibot is the most popular and the longest-running all-Filipino children’s TV show in the Philippines.

As soon as the Children’s Television Workshop animation and simple visual effects, it has made Filipino kids realize that science is indeed an exciting subject to learn.

The Debilitating Effects of TV on Children

Television and Kids: How do I stop my child from watching TV? As a working mother, I usually allow my children to watch something on TV as I whip up dinner. However, when a friend mentioned that TV has negative effects on children, it made me think twice about what I had been doing.

I had been. Most Filipino children watch television for close to 3 hours during weekdays, and 6 hours during weekends, the same study showed. The social effects of improper advertising generally manifest themselves in the form of an adverse effect on child psychology (Haefner, ), human behavior (Lavine et al., ), value system and perception (Roy, ), boost to materialism.

Kids and teens 5 to 18 years: Parents should place consistent limits on screen time, which includes TV, social media, and video games.

The effects of television on filipino children

Media should not take the place of getting enough sleep and being physically active. Seeing Violence. The average American child will witness , violent acts on television by age THE EFFECTS OF LESBIAN AND GAY PARENTING ON CHILDREN’S DEVELOPMENT.

studies interviewed children and parents about favorite television shows, extracurricular activities and vocational aspirations (Golombok and Tasker ). THE EFFECTS OF LESBIAN AND GAY PARENTING ON CHILDREN’S DEVELOPMENT.

The Debilitating Effects of TV on Children